Wurzburg partners with Tanzania

Founded in 2002, the Joseph Cardijn Foundation and the CAJ (YCW) movement in the German Diocese of Würzburg are raising funds for the Uvikambi Centre including a carpentry school and a tailoring workshop in Mbinga in Tanzania. The centre includes guest rooms, a school of carpentry, meeting rooms, a restaurant and a contact point for local people.

“The focus of the funding has always been on the projects of the partnership with the Uvikambi, the Catholic Youth Association in Ming- dia, the partner province of the diocese of Würzburg,” says Andrea Karl, a member of the Board of Trustees of the Joseph Cardijn Foundation.

As well as financing the salaries of local teachers, the Foundation and the Wurzburg CAJ supply toolkits to apprentices who complete their training.

“Young people who have completed their apprenticeship there have already received a toolbox or a sewing machine, depending on their training,” Andrea added.

“As well as in the city of Mbinga, we have been able to launch further projects through our activities in smaller municipalities in the diocese.

“These include a fishing project on the Malawi Sea, for example, which has been running for almost 20 years.”

The Uvikambi local group initiated the fishing project, to improve the lives of fishermen on the Malawi Sea.

“People, for example, are buying nets together to improve living conditions in the Community.” The nets were initially too big, so small fish could not be caught. This is why the Foundation co-financed new networks.

“In 2006 I went to Tanzania for the first time. I wanted to know about the situation there and the development policy situation,” explains Andreal. The effects of globalization were already becoming visible.

“Many big companies are fishing on the Malawi Sea. And there is a huge area on which brown coal is mined. Tanzania has many valuable raw materials in the soil,” Andrea noted.

With a donations coming to around 2000 to 2500 euros per year, there is already a lot going on in Tanzania.

“We pay attention to making donations meaningfully and sustainably, and we are thus in a constant reflection process,” Andrea explained.

The project organisers also evaluate the local contribution to the project.

A donation of 50 euros provides for the purchase of a fishing net, while 100 euros is enough for the construction of a dug-out boat.

For further information, please contact:

Joseph Cardijn Foundation, Treibgasse 26, 63739 Aschaffenburg, Germany

Bank account: Ligabank Würzburg, IBAN DE30750903000003011240, BIC GENODEF1M05

Website: www.cardijn-stiftung.de

SOURCE

A future for the people of Mbinga (Diocese of Wurzburg)

Singapore’s Tony Tay wins 2017 Magsaysay Award

Asia’s Nobel Peace Prize equivalent, the Ramon Magsaysay Award has gone to Singaporean former YCW leader, Tony Tay, for his work in creating the Willing Hearts movement.

Tony grew the movement from 11 volunteers in 2003 to some 300 volunteers at present. It has one  one vision: to provide the underprivileged and marginalized with hot, packed meals every day – even during Christmas and New Year, the Rappler reports.

He described it as a secular, non-affiliated charity that operates a soup kitchen where volunteers prepare and cook thousands of daily meals to be distributed to over 40 locations in Singapore.

“Food keeps families together, and it gives strength, it gives energy, and without food, it will be a big problem. So food comes to unite people,” Tony said.

“Our volunteers will be very, very happy, and they are recognized not only back home but also in Southeast Asia. We feel that they will be happier, and they will come more often [to volunteer],” Tay told Rappler in an interview.

The movement began following his mother’s death when Tony started collecting bread and vegetables and bringing these to the Canossian convent, as inspired by his mother’s own charity work with the Canossian Sisters.

“One day, my wife asked one of the needy, ‘Why you don’t take…the vegetable, you only take bread?’ He said, ‘I don’t cook.’ So my wife said, ‘Can I bring you a meal?'” Tay said.

“And then my wife brought two meals. [Another] one saw it, so he asked, ‘Can you give one meal to him?’ And then people asked more, and then they keep on going.”

In Manila for the award, Tony met with current YCS leaders.

“He approached them and was so happy that they belong to YCS. He introduced himself as a YCW member,” wrote CCI member, Kins Aparace on the CCI Facebook page.

READ MORE

Singapore’s Tony Tay wins 2017 Magsaysay Award (Cardijn.info)