Stubborn man does not “see” climate change: Pope

Returning to Rome following his trip to Colombia, Pope Francis warned that political leaders need to see climate change and its effects in making their decisions.

While we are flying, we are pass near Hurricane Irma which, after causing dozens of deaths in the Caribbean, is now heading towards Florida where there are millions of displaced people. Scientists think that ocean warming makes hurricanes more intense.

“Is there a moral responsibility of those political leaders who refuse to cooperate with other nations by denying that this climate change is man-made?” a journalist asked Pope Francis as his plane passed near Hurricane Irma, which caused dozens of deaths and massive devastation in the Caribbean over the weekend.

“Those who deny this must ask the scientists: they speak very clearly, they are precise,” Pope Francis answered. “The other day the news came out of a Russian ship that went from Norway to Japan and crossed the North Pole without finding ice. From a university, they have said that we only have three years ‘to step back,’, if not, the consequences will be terrible.

“I don’t know if the three years are true or not, but if we don’t step back, we will fall!

“We can see climate change in its effects, and we all have a moral responsibility when we make decisions.

“I think that is a very serious matter. We all have our moral responsibility and politicians have their own. Let them ask the scientists and then decide. History will judge on their decisions,” the pope warned.

Asked why governments are delaying this realization,Pope Francis recalled a biblical phrase.

“A phrase from the Old Testament comes to my mind: man is a stupid man, a stubborn man who does not see, the only animal that falls twice in the same hole. The arrogance and conceit… and then there is the “Mighty Dollar”. Many decisions depend on money.

“Today in Cartagena I started by visiting a poor area of the city. On the other hand, there is the tourist side, luxury, and a kind of luxury without moral measures. But do those who are there not notice this? Do socio-political analysts not realize this?

“When you don’t want to see you don’t see, you look only look at one side,” Pope Francis concluded.

FULL STORY

The Pope on climate change, humankind “is a stupid and stubborn man, that does not see” (Vatican Insider)

End bullying: Cardijn College principal

The principal of Cardijn  College, Noarlunga, Mr Paul Rijken, has called for an end to bullying following the recent death of an Adelaide girl after alleged bullying.

“Sadly, we learnt of the death of a young girl from the south of Adelaide, Libby Bell of what is alleged and reported as systematic bullying and cyber bullying,” the principal wrote in a blog post.

“This is tragic and our heartfelt condolences are extended to the family.

“Much debate is happening in the media regarding the law, for instance in Victoria, the law was changed in 2011 after a 19-year old Brodie Panlock tragically took her life as a result of serious bullying in her workplace.

“The law became known as Brodie’s law and covers bullying behaviour as criminal and subject to significant penalties such as jail. Our law makers are debating these issues now and are investigating how this might be considered into the future.

At Cardijn and (sister school) Marcellin, we are constantly alert to any form of bullying and harassment and continue to educate our students to feel confident enough to report this type of behaviour.

“Join Us by Saying NO to Bullying!!!” he concluded.

SOURCE

Stop bullying and harassment (Principal’s blog, Cardijn College)

Remembering liturgical pioneer Robert E. Rambusch

Robert E. Rambusch, a liturgical artist, designer and pioneer in the profession of liturgical design consultation, died May 23 at the age of 93, the National Catholic  Reporter says.

After serving in World War II, he became international secretary of the newly formed International Young Christian Students while studying  in Paris.

His work significantly influenced the shape of worship in the United States and Canada in a career that spanned more than 65 years, participating in the design and renovation of 24 cathedrals and 400 churches, NCR says.

As a liturgical design consultant, Rambusch developed an open, inclusive process in which the faith community was invited to participate in the sharing of ideas on the image of themselves and the church.

Catholic churches are some of the most difficult structures to design, Rambusch said at a seminar on art and environment for Catholic worship in Saginaw, Michigan, in 1995. The biggest problem, he said, is “to satisfy the fullness of the divinity but [also] the fullness in humanity” or the differences between Christ as God and Christ as man.

A congregation at worship is not people watching events unfold on a stage, he said. Church architects have to design to ensure the active involvement of the congregation in the celebration. “We need a lay-oriented special arrangement that supports their common [worship] as a communal kind of action together,” Rambusch said.

Rambusch worked for more than 35 years at Rambusch Decorating Company, the firm founded by his grandfather, Frode, in New York in 1898. He left in 1984 to found his own firm, Robert E. Rambusch Associates.

Rambusch studied at the Pratt Institute, the University of Toronto with Jacques Maritain, and did post-graduate work at Le Centre de L’Art Sacré in Paris with founder Fr. Marie-Alain Couturier, close associate of the artists Henri Matisse and Fernand Léger. “These studies informed his approach to sacred art and worship spaces. He embraced the principle that religious art cannot develop outside the artistic life of its time,” said his daughter Alexandra Rambusch.

In 1948, he met Dorothy Day, co-founder of the Catholic Worker Movement, and began a lifelong association with the movement.

He is survived by his son, Rob, and daughter, Alexandra, The Tablet adds.

SOURCES

Robert E. Rambusch’s influence on the shape of worship endures (National Catholic Reporter)

READ MORE

Sharon Woolums, Robert Rambusch, 93, liturgical artist, designer (The Villager)

Michael E. De Sanctis, Childlike familiarity with Mystery: an appreciation of Bob Rambusch (National Catholic  Reporter)

Robert E. Rambusch (The Tablet)

Merton’s Correspondence with: Robert E. Rambusch; Robert Rambusch; Bob Rambusch; Rambusch, Bob (Merton Archives)

Robert E.  Rambusch, Interviewed by Sharon Woolums (New York Public Library Oral History Project)

Liturgical artwork by Robert Rambusch (HT: The Villager)
Holy card from Robert E. Rambusch's service

Gospel – If your brother sins against you

15 “If your brother sins against you, go, show him his fault between you and him alone. If he listens to you, you have gained back your brother.

16 But if he doesn’t listen, take one or two more with you, that at the mouth of two or three witnesses every word may be established.✡

17 If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the assembly. If he refuses to hear the assembly also, let him be to you as a Gentile or a tax collector.

18 Most certainly I tell you, whatever things you bind on earth will have been bound in heaven, and whatever things you release on earth will have been released in heaven.

19 Again, assuredly I tell you, that if two of you will agree on earth concerning anything that they will ask, it will be done for them by my Father who is in heaven.

20 For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there I am in the middle of them.”

Gospel of Matthew 18: 15-20

SOURCE

World English Bible

USCCB Daily Readings

http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/091017.cfm

Review questions

Have you had an experience where someone offended or hurt you? Failed to listen to you?

How did you react?

What is Jesus calling us to do in such circumstances?

What does Jesus mean when he say that “anything you bind/loose on earth will be bound/loosened in heaven”?

What does he mean by saying that if anything is asked  by two people, it will be done for them?

What does he mean when he says he will be in the midst of people who gather in his name?

Australia – The same sex marriage survey

No doubt the  biggest issue under discussion in Australia right now is the upcoming same sex marriage (SSM) survey, which will now go ahead after the High Court ruled that there are no constitutional obstacles in its path, SBS News reports.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said the decision would mean all Australians would now get to have their say.

“And that is as it should be, we encourage every Australian to vote in this survey and have their say,” Mr Turnbull said.

“The effect of the decision of the court is that there is now no legal impediment to that postal survey proceeding and all Australians having their say on this important social question,” Attorney General Senator George Brandis told Parliament.

In response, Opposition Leader, Bill Shorten, called for a “yes” vote in favor of same sex marriage.

See

What are the issues at stake in the same sex marriage survey?

Judge

What do you think about same sex marriage?

What other issues are involved? Social welfare for same sex couples? Children?

Have you discussed the issue with your friends, work colleagues? What do they think?

What are the views of different community groups?

Political parties? Churches? Other religions?

Here are several Catholic views:

Prof. Eamonn Conway and Dr Rik Van Nieuwenhove, Where does Pope Francis stand on same-sex marriage? (Irish Catholic)

Archbishop Anthony Fisher of Sydney, Between ideal and reality: What future for marriage in Australia? (Archdiocese of Sydney)

Frank Brennan SJ, Catholics and the marriage equality plebiscite (Eureka Street)

Act

Do you plan to vote in the SSM survey?

How will you vote?

Will you discuss your views with your family, friends, colleagues?

Do you plan to become involved in the campaign either for or against? How? Social media? Rallies? Writing to political leaders?

CREDITS

Photo: Guy of taipei / Wikipedia / CCA BY SA 3.0

World – The plight of the Rohingya people

A social enquiry on the Rohingya issue

This month’s news bulletins are overflowing with stories of Myanmar’s Rohingya people fleeing violence and seeking refuge in neighbouring Bangladesh.

“Baby X was born nine days ago just after his family lost everything they owned,” a United Nations High Commission on Refugees report says.

“They burnt our house and drove us out by shooting. We walked for three days through the jungle. That’s where he was born,” said his father Mohamed, gesturing to the puckered bundle of life.

270,000  people have already fled their burning villages, according to this SBS report.

Now Rohingya Muslim insurgents in Myanmar have declared a one-month unilateral ceasefire to ease the humanitarian crisis in northern Rakhine state, BBC News says.

The Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (Arsa) said the truce would start on Sunday, urging Mynamar’s army to lay down weapons as well.

Arsa attacks on police on 25 August led to a ferocious military response.

Watch raw footage of the events on YouTube here:

Burning Rohingya villages

New fires in empty Rohingya villages

See

What information do you have about these events? Do you know anyone from Myanmar/Burma? Or from neighbouring countries, e.g. Bangladesh, India, Thailand… How  do they explain what has happened?

Judge

What do you think about these events?

What are others saying?

Pope Francis calls for end to violence against Rohingya (Vatican Radio)

U.N. Chief Antonio Guterres Urges Myanmar to Give the Rohingya Legal Status (Time)

Kevin Rudd, Aung San Suu Kyi Faces An Almost Impossible Dilemma. Don’t Give Up On Her. (Buzzfeed)

Britain Betrayed Rohingya After They Helped Them Defeat Japan in World War II (Muslim Stories)

Act

What can we do?

Donate to UNHCR relief efforts?

Can we ask our government leaders to take action?

Singapore’s Tony Tay wins 2017 Magsaysay Award

Asia’s Nobel Peace Prize equivalent, the Ramon Magsaysay Award has gone to Singaporean former YCW leader, Tony Tay, for his work in creating the Willing Hearts movement.

Tony grew the movement from 11 volunteers in 2003 to some 300 volunteers at present. It has one  one vision: to provide the underprivileged and marginalized with hot, packed meals every day – even during Christmas and New Year, the Rappler reports.

He described it as a secular, non-affiliated charity that operates a soup kitchen where volunteers prepare and cook thousands of daily meals to be distributed to over 40 locations in Singapore.

“Food keeps families together, and it gives strength, it gives energy, and without food, it will be a big problem. So food comes to unite people,” Tony said.

“Our volunteers will be very, very happy, and they are recognized not only back home but also in Southeast Asia. We feel that they will be happier, and they will come more often [to volunteer],” Tay told Rappler in an interview.

The movement began following his mother’s death when Tony started collecting bread and vegetables and bringing these to the Canossian convent, as inspired by his mother’s own charity work with the Canossian Sisters.

“One day, my wife asked one of the needy, ‘Why you don’t take…the vegetable, you only take bread?’ He said, ‘I don’t cook.’ So my wife said, ‘Can I bring you a meal?'” Tay said.

“And then my wife brought two meals. [Another] one saw it, so he asked, ‘Can you give one meal to him?’ And then people asked more, and then they keep on going.”

In Manila for the award, Tony met with current YCS leaders.

“He approached them and was so happy that they belong to YCS. He introduced himself as a YCW member,” wrote CCI member, Kins Aparace on the CCI Facebook page.

READ MORE

Singapore’s Tony Tay wins 2017 Magsaysay Award (Cardijn.info)

Race Mathews: Of Labour and Liberty

Race Mathews’ new book, Of Labour and Liberty, Distributism in Victoria, 1891 – 1966, was launched in April this year.

It is an excellent historical account of the role of Catholic social teaching and social activists in general, and of the YCW, in particular, in the development of the cooperative movement in the Australian state of Victoria.

Moreover, it’s not just history. Race Mathews, who was once chief of staff to Australian prime minister, Gough Whitlam, as well as a parliamentarian and government minister in his own right, also sets out some important pointers for the future development of Mondragon style worker cooperatives.

The key, Mathews finds, is the need for formation – formation based on that given by the YCW itself but also carried further as it was by Fr Jose Maria Arizmendiarrietta, the founder of the Mondragon cooperatives.

Read more about the new book in the review that I wrote for the Catholic Weekly:

https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/book-review-race-mathews-fascination-with-the-rise-and-fall-of-distributism-in-victoria/

Labor priests make comeback

The “labor priest” is making a comeback, according to US Catholic magazine.

Leading the charge is Father Clete Kiley, a priest of the Archdiocese of Chicago. As a young priest, Kiley had many opportunities to help workers and to learn from the previous generation of labor priests. He eventually received the permission of Cardinal Francis George, Chicago’s archbishop at the time, to pursue this work full time as the director of immigration policy for the labor union UNITE HERE.

In 2012, Kiley followed in his mentors’ footsteps by organizing a new generation of priests in the labor movement. Working with the National Federation of Priests’ Councils, Kiley founded the Priest-Labor Initiative, a group of bishops, priests, and scholars committed to supporting worker justice.

In this interview from the September 2015 issue of U.S. Catholic, Kiley discusses the history of the labor priests and their role in the church today.

Among the many priests, he mentions are early Chicago YCW chaplains, Reynold Hillenbrand and Jack Egan.

FULL STORY

Catholic priests and the labor movement (US Catholic)