Movements pioneered alternative seminary formation

France’s University Formation Group (GFU), which allows young men to combine secular and seminary studies, is celebrating its 50th anniversary, La Croix International reports.

This is a made-to-measure pathway for students who wish to become priests but without abandoning their existing studies. It was launched fifty years ago this year under the auspices of France’s Mission Ouvrière (Worker Mission) and the Catholic Action movements.

“At that time in 1967, the number of seminarians was in free fall and the bishops had decided to close down the minor seminaries,” recalls Fr Emmanuel Goulard, superior of the GFU seminary.

“The seminary was therefore founded as a place of discernment and initial formation for students while they continued their university studies,” he explains.

This was a specifically French innovation that has continued to develop over the course of the last half century.

There were around one hundred such students during the early 1980s when Lille vicar general, Fr Bruno Cazin, who is also a medical doctor, took this path.

Now there are seventeen GFU students across France with four or five new students beginning the program each year.

Fr Cazin, a specialist in hematology [the study and treatment of blood], is convinced that the pathway continues to offer great value.

“It was while working in a hospital that I really came to understand Christ and the Gospel and that is why I stayed,” he explains.

“The GFU pathway also allows students or young professionals to test their vocation by sharing the daily life of people.”

To sum up, an extra muros seminarian fully combines seminary and student life until, after completing their engineering, philosophy or other secular studies, begin the classical theological studies leading to the priesthood.

FULL STORY

Alternative seminary formation celebrates golden jubilee (La Croix International)

Séminaristes et étudiants, deux vies en une (La Croix)

PHOTO

Diocese of Amiens

Asociación Cardijn works with young people and immigrants

The Association Cardijn was created in Cádiz, Spain, in 1993 with the aim of working with the most disadvantaged social groups, particularly young people from poor areas and immigrants.

Its purposes are:

  • Integral promotion of all people from working and popular environments.
  • Awareness, information, orientation, formation and promotion of young people, especially from poor and working class areas
  • Awareness, information, orientation, counseling, reception, training and promotion of migrants – immigrants and migrants – and especially those in situations of greater vulnerability.
  • Information, orientation, training and promotion work and professional, as well as assistance in finding employment both domestic and foreign.
  • Collaboration with the various public or private administrations that intervene or are interested for the same purposes.

In 2005 it joined the CONSORCIO “SECRETARIADOS DE MIGRACIONES”, which is part of a state action and represented in four Autonomous Communities: Madrid, Valencia, Andalusia and Ceuta.

Its three main areas of work are young people, immigrants and employment.

Website

http://www.asociacioncardijn.org/

Freddy Fesaitu revives Rootstrata

Fiji YCW leader, Freddy Fesaitu, recently revived his 1980s reggae band, Rootstrata.

Founded with YCW members from the Raiwaqa neighbourhood in Suva, the group made a strong impact during its time.

“Back in the late 1980s, Rootstrata was ahead of its time with hard hitting songs that encapsulated the feelings of unemployed and dejected youths looking for a way out of their predicament in the notorious suburbs of Raiwai and Raiwaqa,” wrote Ernest Heatley at the Fiji Times.

The lyrics of the group’s hit song, People of the world unite, shows strong YCW – and Bob Marley – influence.

“Your life is worth more than all the gold,” Freddy sings in a phrase that echoes Cardijn’s famous axiom that “every young worker is worth more than all the gold in the world.”

READ MORE

Rootstrata (Fiji Lyrics)

Rootstrata revival (Fiji Times)

Freddy roots for Jesus (Rotuma.net)

Wurzburg partners with Tanzania

Founded in 2002, the Joseph Cardijn Foundation and the CAJ (YCW) movement in the German Diocese of Würzburg are raising funds for the Uvikambi Centre including a carpentry school and a tailoring workshop in Mbinga in Tanzania. The centre includes guest rooms, a school of carpentry, meeting rooms, a restaurant and a contact point for local people.

“The focus of the funding has always been on the projects of the partnership with the Uvikambi, the Catholic Youth Association in Ming- dia, the partner province of the diocese of Würzburg,” says Andrea Karl, a member of the Board of Trustees of the Joseph Cardijn Foundation.

As well as financing the salaries of local teachers, the Foundation and the Wurzburg CAJ supply toolkits to apprentices who complete their training.

“Young people who have completed their apprenticeship there have already received a toolbox or a sewing machine, depending on their training,” Andrea added.

“As well as in the city of Mbinga, we have been able to launch further projects through our activities in smaller municipalities in the diocese.

“These include a fishing project on the Malawi Sea, for example, which has been running for almost 20 years.”

The Uvikambi local group initiated the fishing project, to improve the lives of fishermen on the Malawi Sea.

“People, for example, are buying nets together to improve living conditions in the Community.” The nets were initially too big, so small fish could not be caught. This is why the Foundation co-financed new networks.

“In 2006 I went to Tanzania for the first time. I wanted to know about the situation there and the development policy situation,” explains Andreal. The effects of globalization were already becoming visible.

“Many big companies are fishing on the Malawi Sea. And there is a huge area on which brown coal is mined. Tanzania has many valuable raw materials in the soil,” Andrea noted.

With a donations coming to around 2000 to 2500 euros per year, there is already a lot going on in Tanzania.

“We pay attention to making donations meaningfully and sustainably, and we are thus in a constant reflection process,” Andrea explained.

The project organisers also evaluate the local contribution to the project.

A donation of 50 euros provides for the purchase of a fishing net, while 100 euros is enough for the construction of a dug-out boat.

For further information, please contact:

Joseph Cardijn Foundation, Treibgasse 26, 63739 Aschaffenburg, Germany

Bank account: Ligabank Würzburg, IBAN DE30750903000003011240, BIC GENODEF1M05

Website: www.cardijn-stiftung.de

SOURCE

A future for the people of Mbinga (Diocese of Wurzburg)

The doctrinal foundations of the YCW

At the First International Congress of the YCW in 1935, Cardijn delivered his classical “Three truths” talk setting out the “Truth of faith,” the “Truth of reality,” and the “Truth of method” on which the movement was based.

He went further in 1950 at the International Congress held in Brussels, where he delivered a series of in depth talks, including “The doctrinal foundations of the YCW,” which further developed his “three truths” concept, which we present here.

I. A Truth of Faith

The Mission of the Young Workers in the Working Class

1. Each young worker and working girl has an eternal destiny. They are human persons. Not machines, not slaves or beasts of burden; they are the sons, the collaborators, the heirs of God. They are made to the image of God. This personal characteristic is sacred and inviolable; it gives to each young worker a personal dignity: the young worker is an end, an absolute in himself. One cannot respect God if one does not respect the human person.

2. This truth is universal and applies to every race, every people, every country, every age. is the lever, the motor, the stimulus of every civilisation and all human progress.

3. This eternal destiny does not begin after death. It becomes incarnate in time to flower out in eternity. From the very moment of his conception in his mother’s womb, the future young worker finds in this destiny the source of his rights to life, to education, to protection, to health, to justice. Far from being a philosophic justification or an opium, a cause or a pretext for escape, for resignation, it is the foundation of all deproletarisation, the guarantee against all violence, the inspiration of all liberation.

It gives to each young worker a vocation, a personal mission, which transforms his life into a collaboration with God, with all men, for the achievement of the divine plan in the work of creation and redemption, Created by God, redeemed by Christ, the young worker is their necessary collaborator, but freely, wilfully, through love. Not a starveling of the earth, but a responsible citizen of the City of God and of the city of men.

4. This vocation, this mission of the young worker, gives to his work, to his profession, a human and divine value. Work is not a shameful thing, a “come down”, a punishment, but a service, a ministering to his personal fulfilment and that of humanity. Without work there can be nothing: no humanity, no civilisation, no religion. This vocation demands a regime of work which excludes the exploitation and proletarisation, and which guarantees a collaboration in justice and equity.

5. This personal vocation is expressed in the family vocation and mission of each young worker. This vocation is fulfilled in the working class family which ensures the complementary vocation of the spouses and of the parents of the young worker and young working girl, with a view to the procreation and education of children. Without families, there can be no children, no citizens, no priests, no apostles.

6. This personal vocation makes clear the communal vocation and mission of each young worker, which is incarnate in every working class community, professional and local. The young worker is the first and immediate apostle and collaborator of his comrades, his companions, his neighbours. This implies a community of life, of destiny, of mutual aid, of friendship, of brotherhood. The young worker must not be an escapist, but an internal ferment, inseparable from the community in which he lives.

7. This personal vocation makes clear the mission, the vocation of the working class, which comprises all working class families and communities, in which all are united together and feel their responsibility for the transformation of all environments of life and regime of work, bearing the aspirations toward a full emancipation of the working masses of the world.

8. This vocation, this mission of working youth and of the whole working class, is their own irreplaceable vocation which inspires a conception of life, a spirit of life, a manner of life. This conception, this spirit, this manner of life must be acquired, especially between the ages of 14 and 25, between school and marriage, through a properly adapted education.

9. This vocation, this mission is essentially religious, apostolic, and missionary, and gives to each young worker, to each working class family, to all working class communities, to the whole* working class an apostolic responsibility which demands a training, graces, union with God, with Christ, with the Church.

10. The Church spreads throughout the world this essential truth concerning the destiny of each young worker and of the whole working class. By its doctrine and its grace, by its apostolate and its organisation, it enables this truth to become a living reality in the world and in history.

The State, national and international institutions, working class and employers’ organisations and the economic regimes must place this truth at the basis of their achievements, with a view to the progress of national and international communities.

11. This vocation, this mission of the young worker and of the working class will decide the future of humanity and of the Church.

II. A Truth of Experience:

A Flagrant Contradiction,

N.B. – This point of the lesson must be presented in a much more concrete form than point 1; in particular, it will be necessary to recall in all that follows, some of the facts and problems noted in the preceding lesson; “The Situation of Working Youth in the World”, in order to give a factual basis to the remarks that follow.

The various enquiries made at the occasion of the International Conference show once again the flagrant contradiction in 19$0 which exists between the plan of God and the tragic situation of the young workers and of the working class in the world.

These enquiries show:

– the ignorance of the young workers concerning their eternal destiny and their temporal mission.

– the contradiction between this mission and their conditions of housing, work, and life.

– the lack of preparation of the young workers before their entry in work.

– the abandonment in which all young workers find themselves on entering work, when they are lonely, isolated, far from their family and their teachers.

– the disastrous influence of this ignorance, this opposition and this isolation.

– the powerlessness of the young worker in the face of the system which rules the economic life and even the thought of the modem world: capitalism, “liberal economics”.

– the disastrous consequences for the young workers, for working class families, for the working class, for humanity for the Church; proletarisation, general indifference, despair, revolt, war.

– the irresistible influence of the great idealogical talents which are at present moving the masses; materialism, naturalism, existentialism, nationalism, communism, etc.

On the other hand, those enquiries have also shown something of the great living riches of working youth today in many countries: generosity, thirst for liberty, for justice, sincerity, sense of international brotherhood, etc.

These positive characteristics need further careful study, and will serve as starting points for the building of the true solution to the problem: the YCW.

III. A Truth of Method:

An Internal Solution

1. The achievement of the personal, communal, and family destiny of each young worker is conditioned by a number of efforts which must be made by the young workers themselves, so that they may train themselves, unite themselves, and support themselves in order to discover and to achieve together their own proper personal and collective mission in the uplifting and deproletarisation of the working class of the world. This personal and collective effort is especially necessary from 14-25 years, from school to marriage; before that time it is impossible; afterwards it is too late. It must coincide with the age at which human beings become persons.

2. This effort of the young workers in the discovery and achievement of their mission and the development of their personality, instead of being directed toward an individual trend, must be done from the inside, for the transformation of the environments of life, by those who belong to those environments of life, efforts of the young workers, to establish justice and charity in their environment of life; efforts to animate and develop the workers movement; efforts to create a human and Christian atmosphere in these environments of life, and thus make them more suited to their providential destiny.

3. This effort of working youth for its personal education and the transformation of the environments of life, demands and creates the reforms in social, economic, political, and cultural institutions; it is the condition and the guarantee of the success of those reforms. The latter are most urgent and necessary in a society which needs to learn how to respect the dignity of human personality in each young worker, without distinction of class, nationality, religion or race, and which has to seek to create a real and efficacious collaboration within the world of work, on the national and international plane.

These “external” reforms will be all the more efficacious if they are based at the same time on the efforts at self-education of the young workers themselves, who are trying to assume their own responsibilities toward their environment. Without that realisation by youth and the working class of their dignity and responsibility, all external reforms will be insufficient to solve the working class problems.

b. The YCW aims at achieving this organised effort of the young workers themselves who “between themselves, by themselves, and for themselves” are trained and exercised with a view to a permanent apostolate in the working class movement and in view of the uplifting of the working class which will remove proletarian conditions from the world.

5. The Church must inspire, guide and sustain the organised effort of the young workers, which must teach them and help them to achieve not only their personal vocation, but also their apostolate within the working class and the working class movement, for the total rechristianisation of their life, their environment of life, and their institutions of life.

The State, public institutions, and private organisations must support the organised effort of the young workers and assist an effective collaboration for the training and protection of working youth.

READ MORE

Joseph Cardijn, The doctrinal foundations of the YCW and its essential characteristics

Joseph Cardijn, The three truths

Stubborn man does not “see” climate change: Pope

Returning to Rome following his trip to Colombia, Pope Francis warned that political leaders need to see climate change and its effects in making their decisions.

While we are flying, we are pass near Hurricane Irma which, after causing dozens of deaths in the Caribbean, is now heading towards Florida where there are millions of displaced people. Scientists think that ocean warming makes hurricanes more intense.

“Is there a moral responsibility of those political leaders who refuse to cooperate with other nations by denying that this climate change is man-made?” a journalist asked Pope Francis as his plane passed near Hurricane Irma, which caused dozens of deaths and massive devastation in the Caribbean over the weekend.

“Those who deny this must ask the scientists: they speak very clearly, they are precise,” Pope Francis answered. “The other day the news came out of a Russian ship that went from Norway to Japan and crossed the North Pole without finding ice. From a university, they have said that we only have three years ‘to step back,’, if not, the consequences will be terrible.

“I don’t know if the three years are true or not, but if we don’t step back, we will fall!

“We can see climate change in its effects, and we all have a moral responsibility when we make decisions.

“I think that is a very serious matter. We all have our moral responsibility and politicians have their own. Let them ask the scientists and then decide. History will judge on their decisions,” the pope warned.

Asked why governments are delaying this realization,Pope Francis recalled a biblical phrase.

“A phrase from the Old Testament comes to my mind: man is a stupid man, a stubborn man who does not see, the only animal that falls twice in the same hole. The arrogance and conceit… and then there is the “Mighty Dollar”. Many decisions depend on money.

“Today in Cartagena I started by visiting a poor area of the city. On the other hand, there is the tourist side, luxury, and a kind of luxury without moral measures. But do those who are there not notice this? Do socio-political analysts not realize this?

“When you don’t want to see you don’t see, you look only look at one side,” Pope Francis concluded.

FULL STORY

The Pope on climate change, humankind “is a stupid and stubborn man, that does not see” (Vatican Insider)

End bullying: Cardijn College principal

The principal of Cardijn  College, Noarlunga, Mr Paul Rijken, has called for an end to bullying following the recent death of an Adelaide girl after alleged bullying.

“Sadly, we learnt of the death of a young girl from the south of Adelaide, Libby Bell of what is alleged and reported as systematic bullying and cyber bullying,” the principal wrote in a blog post.

“This is tragic and our heartfelt condolences are extended to the family.

“Much debate is happening in the media regarding the law, for instance in Victoria, the law was changed in 2011 after a 19-year old Brodie Panlock tragically took her life as a result of serious bullying in her workplace.

“The law became known as Brodie’s law and covers bullying behaviour as criminal and subject to significant penalties such as jail. Our law makers are debating these issues now and are investigating how this might be considered into the future.

At Cardijn and (sister school) Marcellin, we are constantly alert to any form of bullying and harassment and continue to educate our students to feel confident enough to report this type of behaviour.

“Join Us by Saying NO to Bullying!!!” he concluded.

SOURCE

Stop bullying and harassment (Principal’s blog, Cardijn College)

Remembering liturgical pioneer Robert E. Rambusch

Robert E. Rambusch, a liturgical artist, designer and pioneer in the profession of liturgical design consultation, died May 23 at the age of 93, the National Catholic  Reporter says.

After serving in World War II, he became international secretary of the newly formed International Young Christian Students while studying  in Paris.

His work significantly influenced the shape of worship in the United States and Canada in a career that spanned more than 65 years, participating in the design and renovation of 24 cathedrals and 400 churches, NCR says.

As a liturgical design consultant, Rambusch developed an open, inclusive process in which the faith community was invited to participate in the sharing of ideas on the image of themselves and the church.

Catholic churches are some of the most difficult structures to design, Rambusch said at a seminar on art and environment for Catholic worship in Saginaw, Michigan, in 1995. The biggest problem, he said, is “to satisfy the fullness of the divinity but [also] the fullness in humanity” or the differences between Christ as God and Christ as man.

A congregation at worship is not people watching events unfold on a stage, he said. Church architects have to design to ensure the active involvement of the congregation in the celebration. “We need a lay-oriented special arrangement that supports their common [worship] as a communal kind of action together,” Rambusch said.

Rambusch worked for more than 35 years at Rambusch Decorating Company, the firm founded by his grandfather, Frode, in New York in 1898. He left in 1984 to found his own firm, Robert E. Rambusch Associates.

Rambusch studied at the Pratt Institute, the University of Toronto with Jacques Maritain, and did post-graduate work at Le Centre de L’Art Sacré in Paris with founder Fr. Marie-Alain Couturier, close associate of the artists Henri Matisse and Fernand Léger. “These studies informed his approach to sacred art and worship spaces. He embraced the principle that religious art cannot develop outside the artistic life of its time,” said his daughter Alexandra Rambusch.

In 1948, he met Dorothy Day, co-founder of the Catholic Worker Movement, and began a lifelong association with the movement.

He is survived by his son, Rob, and daughter, Alexandra, The Tablet adds.

SOURCES

Robert E. Rambusch’s influence on the shape of worship endures (National Catholic Reporter)

READ MORE

Sharon Woolums, Robert Rambusch, 93, liturgical artist, designer (The Villager)

Michael E. De Sanctis, Childlike familiarity with Mystery: an appreciation of Bob Rambusch (National Catholic  Reporter)

Robert E. Rambusch (The Tablet)

Merton’s Correspondence with: Robert E. Rambusch; Robert Rambusch; Bob Rambusch; Rambusch, Bob (Merton Archives)

Robert E.  Rambusch, Interviewed by Sharon Woolums (New York Public Library Oral History Project)

Liturgical artwork by Robert Rambusch (HT: The Villager)
Holy card from Robert E. Rambusch's service

Gospel – If your brother sins against you

15 “If your brother sins against you, go, show him his fault between you and him alone. If he listens to you, you have gained back your brother.

16 But if he doesn’t listen, take one or two more with you, that at the mouth of two or three witnesses every word may be established.✡

17 If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the assembly. If he refuses to hear the assembly also, let him be to you as a Gentile or a tax collector.

18 Most certainly I tell you, whatever things you bind on earth will have been bound in heaven, and whatever things you release on earth will have been released in heaven.

19 Again, assuredly I tell you, that if two of you will agree on earth concerning anything that they will ask, it will be done for them by my Father who is in heaven.

20 For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there I am in the middle of them.”

Gospel of Matthew 18: 15-20

SOURCE

World English Bible

USCCB Daily Readings

http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/091017.cfm

Review questions

Have you had an experience where someone offended or hurt you? Failed to listen to you?

How did you react?

What is Jesus calling us to do in such circumstances?

What does Jesus mean when he say that “anything you bind/loose on earth will be bound/loosened in heaven”?

What does he mean by saying that if anything is asked  by two people, it will be done for them?

What does he mean when he says he will be in the midst of people who gather in his name?

Australia – The same sex marriage survey

No doubt the  biggest issue under discussion in Australia right now is the upcoming same sex marriage (SSM) survey, which will now go ahead after the High Court ruled that there are no constitutional obstacles in its path, SBS News reports.

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said the decision would mean all Australians would now get to have their say.

“And that is as it should be, we encourage every Australian to vote in this survey and have their say,” Mr Turnbull said.

“The effect of the decision of the court is that there is now no legal impediment to that postal survey proceeding and all Australians having their say on this important social question,” Attorney General Senator George Brandis told Parliament.

In response, Opposition Leader, Bill Shorten, called for a “yes” vote in favor of same sex marriage.

See

What are the issues at stake in the same sex marriage survey?

Judge

What do you think about same sex marriage?

What other issues are involved? Social welfare for same sex couples? Children?

Have you discussed the issue with your friends, work colleagues? What do they think?

What are the views of different community groups?

Political parties? Churches? Other religions?

Here are several Catholic views:

Prof. Eamonn Conway and Dr Rik Van Nieuwenhove, Where does Pope Francis stand on same-sex marriage? (Irish Catholic)

Archbishop Anthony Fisher of Sydney, Between ideal and reality: What future for marriage in Australia? (Archdiocese of Sydney)

Frank Brennan SJ, Catholics and the marriage equality plebiscite (Eureka Street)

Act

Do you plan to vote in the SSM survey?

How will you vote?

Will you discuss your views with your family, friends, colleagues?

Do you plan to become involved in the campaign either for or against? How? Social media? Rallies? Writing to political leaders?

CREDITS

Photo: Guy of taipei / Wikipedia / CCA BY SA 3.0

World – The plight of the Rohingya people

A social enquiry on the Rohingya issue

This month’s news bulletins are overflowing with stories of Myanmar’s Rohingya people fleeing violence and seeking refuge in neighbouring Bangladesh.

“Baby X was born nine days ago just after his family lost everything they owned,” a United Nations High Commission on Refugees report says.

“They burnt our house and drove us out by shooting. We walked for three days through the jungle. That’s where he was born,” said his father Mohamed, gesturing to the puckered bundle of life.

270,000  people have already fled their burning villages, according to this SBS report.

Now Rohingya Muslim insurgents in Myanmar have declared a one-month unilateral ceasefire to ease the humanitarian crisis in northern Rakhine state, BBC News says.

The Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (Arsa) said the truce would start on Sunday, urging Mynamar’s army to lay down weapons as well.

Arsa attacks on police on 25 August led to a ferocious military response.

Watch raw footage of the events on YouTube here:

Burning Rohingya villages

New fires in empty Rohingya villages

See

What information do you have about these events? Do you know anyone from Myanmar/Burma? Or from neighbouring countries, e.g. Bangladesh, India, Thailand… How  do they explain what has happened?

Judge

What do you think about these events?

What are others saying?

Pope Francis calls for end to violence against Rohingya (Vatican Radio)

U.N. Chief Antonio Guterres Urges Myanmar to Give the Rohingya Legal Status (Time)

Kevin Rudd, Aung San Suu Kyi Faces An Almost Impossible Dilemma. Don’t Give Up On Her. (Buzzfeed)

Britain Betrayed Rohingya After They Helped Them Defeat Japan in World War II (Muslim Stories)

Act

What can we do?

Donate to UNHCR relief efforts?

Can we ask our government leaders to take action?

Singapore’s Tony Tay wins 2017 Magsaysay Award

Asia’s Nobel Peace Prize equivalent, the Ramon Magsaysay Award has gone to Singaporean former YCW leader, Tony Tay, for his work in creating the Willing Hearts movement.

Tony grew the movement from 11 volunteers in 2003 to some 300 volunteers at present. It has one  one vision: to provide the underprivileged and marginalized with hot, packed meals every day – even during Christmas and New Year, the Rappler reports.

He described it as a secular, non-affiliated charity that operates a soup kitchen where volunteers prepare and cook thousands of daily meals to be distributed to over 40 locations in Singapore.

“Food keeps families together, and it gives strength, it gives energy, and without food, it will be a big problem. So food comes to unite people,” Tony said.

“Our volunteers will be very, very happy, and they are recognized not only back home but also in Southeast Asia. We feel that they will be happier, and they will come more often [to volunteer],” Tay told Rappler in an interview.

The movement began following his mother’s death when Tony started collecting bread and vegetables and bringing these to the Canossian convent, as inspired by his mother’s own charity work with the Canossian Sisters.

“One day, my wife asked one of the needy, ‘Why you don’t take…the vegetable, you only take bread?’ He said, ‘I don’t cook.’ So my wife said, ‘Can I bring you a meal?'” Tay said.

“And then my wife brought two meals. [Another] one saw it, so he asked, ‘Can you give one meal to him?’ And then people asked more, and then they keep on going.”

In Manila for the award, Tony met with current YCS leaders.

“He approached them and was so happy that they belong to YCS. He introduced himself as a YCW member,” wrote CCI member, Kins Aparace on the CCI Facebook page.

READ MORE

Singapore’s Tony Tay wins 2017 Magsaysay Award (Cardijn.info)

Race Mathews: Of Labour and Liberty

Race Mathews’ new book, Of Labour and Liberty, Distributism in Victoria, 1891 – 1966, was launched in April this year.

It is an excellent historical account of the role of Catholic social teaching and social activists in general, and of the YCW, in particular, in the development of the cooperative movement in the Australian state of Victoria.

Moreover, it’s not just history. Race Mathews, who was once chief of staff to Australian prime minister, Gough Whitlam, as well as a parliamentarian and government minister in his own right, also sets out some important pointers for the future development of Mondragon style worker cooperatives.

The key, Mathews finds, is the need for formation – formation based on that given by the YCW itself but also carried further as it was by Fr Jose Maria Arizmendiarrietta, the founder of the Mondragon cooperatives.

Read more about the new book in the review that I wrote for the Catholic Weekly:

https://www.catholicweekly.com.au/book-review-race-mathews-fascination-with-the-rise-and-fall-of-distributism-in-victoria/

Labor priests make comeback

The “labor priest” is making a comeback, according to US Catholic magazine.

Leading the charge is Father Clete Kiley, a priest of the Archdiocese of Chicago. As a young priest, Kiley had many opportunities to help workers and to learn from the previous generation of labor priests. He eventually received the permission of Cardinal Francis George, Chicago’s archbishop at the time, to pursue this work full time as the director of immigration policy for the labor union UNITE HERE.

In 2012, Kiley followed in his mentors’ footsteps by organizing a new generation of priests in the labor movement. Working with the National Federation of Priests’ Councils, Kiley founded the Priest-Labor Initiative, a group of bishops, priests, and scholars committed to supporting worker justice.

In this interview from the September 2015 issue of U.S. Catholic, Kiley discusses the history of the labor priests and their role in the church today.

Among the many priests, he mentions are early Chicago YCW chaplains, Reynold Hillenbrand and Jack Egan.

FULL STORY

Catholic priests and the labor movement (US Catholic)